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Parabiosis: Elite Transfusing Blood of the Young? Original Research Funded by Rockefeller Foundation

Source: Natural News

By raptorman

Parabiosis refers to the transfusing of blood from one subject to another literally combining the circulatory systems of two animals. Some scientific studies have shown reported health and longevity benefits to older mice if paired with younger mice. This came into the mainstream view with headlines about tech billionaires injecting young people’s blood for life extension. While adherents of this practice claim to get blood from legal means, we shall examine the science and legality of that proposal. This is in no way inferring that any particular person is violating the law.

Like the top of an iceberg sticking above the water, this is instructive of what may lie beneath or ahead. Many articles detail the very wealthy’s interest in the process of transfusing the blood of the young for its rejuvenating properties. The ghoulish concept was calmly reported and widely lampooned in the media with no serious look at what it really means. While the use of the blood of the young by the elite is nothing new in history, this takes matters to a new industrial level.

Any of the recent articles on the subject are carbon copies of each other, all referencing the same report in the journal Nature. Mentioning only the same part of the report entitled Ageing Research: Blood to blood and not considering the deeper implications.

In the past few years, however, a small number of labs have revived parabiosis, especially in the field of ageing research. By joining the circulatory system of an old mouse to that of a young mouse, scientists have produced some remarkable results. In the heart, brain, muscles and almost every other tissue examined, the blood of young mice seems to bring new life to ageing organs, making old mice stronger, smarter and healthier. It even makes their fur shinier. Now these labs have begun to identify the components of young blood that are responsible for these changes. And last September, a clinical trial in California became the first to start testing the benefits of young blood in older people with Alzheimer’s disease.

Keep in mind that very rich and powerful people throughout history have always exploited target populations for their resources. This leads to two primary questions:

How young is the blood needed for the effects?

How is this blood obtained?

About the first question, again quoting from the same article in the journal Nature just a few paragraphs down. This part was conveniently left out of the mainstream pieces.

Clive McCay, a biochemist and gerontologist at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, was the first to apply parabiosis to the study of ageing. In 1956, his team joined 69 pairs of rats, almost all of differing ages3. The linked rats included a 1.5-month-old paired with a 16-month-old — the equivalent of pairing a 5-year-old human with a 47-year-old. It was not a pretty experiment.

The very young were paired with the old. Not sort of young like an 18-year-old, really young like a 5-year-old!! With humans pairing the equivalent of an 18-year-old with a 47-year-old might be acceptable. Whereas pairing a 47-year-old with a 5-year-old is definitely not. All of this is certainly not good for the young host as it is sucked dry of its vitality. The younger the host the more vitality there is to be had.

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